Condorcet Voting

Condorcet Voting Method is an election method that meets the  Condorcet Criterion in deciding the winner of candidate elections.  The  Condorcet candidate is the candidate that would ultimately defeat all the other candidates in head to head match ups, or run off elections. While a  Condorcet candidate does not always exist, the  Condorcet Criterion will determine the  Condorcet candidate in the event of one candidate being able to defeat all other candidates.

 

Originally named and perceived by mathematician Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas Caritat, the method has undergone adjustments since its inception to now be based heavily on voter ranked preferences.

 

To begin calculating the   Condorcet candidate, voters must rank all the candidates in the order of their preference, with 1 being their first choice, 2 being their second choice, 3 being their third choice, 4 being their fourth choice and so on. The method does allow a tie ranking in the event that a voter has no preference between certain candidates, where both candidates would be given the equal rank.

 

For every ballot submitted the rankings of the candidates are then compared to one another. The ranking of each candidate must be compared to the ranking of the other candidates on the ballot and each win earns the candidate being compared a tally. The candidate that wins every match up against the other prospective officials is the Condorcet candidate, and the winner of the election.

 

 

Condorcet Voting Method is an election method that meets the  Condorcet Criterion in deciding the winner of candidate elections.  The  Condorcet candidate is the candidate that would ultimately defeat all the other candidates in head to head match ups, or run off elections. While a  Condorcet candidate does not always exist, the  Condorcet Criterion will determine the  Condorcet candidate in the event of one candidate being able to defeat all other candidates.   Originally named and perceived by mathematician Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas Caritat, the method has undergone adjustments since its inception to now be based heavily on voter ranked preferences.   To begin calculating the   Condorcet candidate, voters must rank all the candidates in the order of their preference, with 1 being their first choice, 2 being their second choice, 3 being their third choice, 4 being their fourth choice and so on. The method does allow a tie ranking in the event that a voter has no preference between certain candidates, where both candidates would be given the equal rank.

 

It is important to note that the Condorcet may not necessarily be any voter’s number one option, however if the ordered preferences in aggregate place one candidate above all the other candidates in head to head match ups, he or she is the winner.

 

Finding the Condorcet Candidate Method

 

The first step as stated above is to have the electorate vote. Unlike the elections we are used to, voters ranks the candidates in the order of their preference and may also rank candidates for a tie if they are held just as favorably as another candidate. The advantage of this system over the single cast vote system is that the voter’s true preferences are weighted and all candidates get a portion of a vote so that in the event of uncertainty in the result, the Condorcet candidate can easily be determined. Again, if there are 4 candidates, the voter ranks them in the order of preference, with 1 being their number one pick and 4 being the last pick.

 

Condorcet Voting
Condorcet Voting
Condorcet Candidate
Condorcet Candidate